Back
to top
toggle menu

Turf Tips

< Go Back

Quackgrass

What is Quackgrass? 

Quackgrass, sometimes referred to as couch or twitch grass, is a perennial field grass that is found in home lawns. Their roots can grow as long as 20-feet long and is often confused with Crabgrass. 

A small amount of Quackgrass in a lawn usually blends in, however, if the amounts are too high, non-selective controls (killing the entire area and starting over) may be necessary.

Quick facts about the culture/reproduction of Quackgrass
  • Quackgrass is faster-growing, lighter green in color, and a much thicker blade than desirable lawn grasses such as Kentucky Bluegrass.
  • Weak lawns are ideal sites for the invasion of unsightly Quackgrass.
  • Infrequent grass cutting and poor watering habits encourage Quackgrass invasion.
  • Quackgrass thrives in undernourished, weak lawns and will quickly spread throughout the lawn.
  • Quackgrass reproduces most often by vigorous underground stems called rhizomes.
  • Few people are aware of Quackgrass invasion until desirable grasses such as Kentucky Bluegrass are crowded out.
  • Quackgrass gives the lawn a coarse, uneven appearance.
Controlling Quackgrass

A small amount of Quackgrass usually will not cause a problem; however, if areas of the lawn become unsightly, they would have to be selectively killed off and re-seeded in the early fall season. Please call your local Weed Man for assistance or recommendations.

Get a Quote

Are you ready to elevate your curb appeal? DeVries Landscape is here to exceed your expectations with all your lawn and landscaping needs. Click below to get a free quote ASAP!

FREE QUOTE!

Main Service Areas

DeVries services the greater Grand Rapids area with the finest commercial and residential outdoor care. Service areas vary. 

Contact us at 616-669-0500 for more information.

I appreciate my lawn mowing tech and the excellent job he does! He is friendly, hard-working and does great work!

S.K.

Grandville I May '19

Turf Tip

Yellow Patch

Yellow Patch is most prevalent from late fall to early spring when temperatures are less than 60°F (16°C). It occurs in areas that receive more than 10 hours of leaf wetness for several days in a row and on turf that has excessive thatch and high nitrogen levels. Learn more about how to manage and prevent Yellow Patch here.
READ MORE